Category Archives: Uncategorized

Chinese chef meltdown at “SO”

The sign outside SO on Thursday. Photo via Eater

The sign outside SO on Thursday. Photo via Eater

 

from BRIAN WALLACE

A chef at popular Asian wings spot SO (1010 Bryant Street at 8th) apparently stormed out and forced the closure of the restaurant after getting one too many whiny customers Thursday night. Somebody clearly asked about gluten-free items, because one of the angry things the chef put in his “we’re closed” sign on the door was “[we] don’t give a shit about gluten free.”

Customers also probably ask whether SO uses MSG (they do) a little too often, because that was front and center on the sign, right after, “We are closed because of YOU … (customers).”

Also, according to an employee who spoke to Eater, there was an incident involving a party who refused to pay their bill because their food was too spicy. Anyway, the chef just “needed to cool off” and they’re back open today.

Sidenote: MSG is delicious.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

South Beach Democratic Club hosts D6 Supe candidates tomorrow night

[9/9/2014 update: To receive the Club’s endorsement a candidate must receive 60% of the votes cast. Here are the results]:
District 6 Supervisor – No Endorsement
State Assembly District 17 – David Campos
Public Defender – Jeff Adachi
Superior Court Judge – Daniel Flores
Board of Education – No Endorsement
Community College Board (3 seats open) – Wendy Aragon and Thea Selby
Community College Board – No Endorsement
 

Jane Kim is seeking reelection in a sleepy race that has only attracted three challengers. Rincon Hill activist Jamie Whitaker, Tenderloin community organizer Michael Nulty and David Carlos Salaverry, an independent cabinetmaker-contractor, part-time Uber driver and a Republican, are all seeking to unseat the first-term Supervisor to represent District 6.  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

A curious lack of curiosity

340 bryant

Sue Hestor is obviously annoyed by the Planning Department’s less than credible attempts to expedite the conversion of service and light industrial space to office use. She’s currently butting heads with planner Erika Jackson over 340 Bryant Street, an empty building. Turns out one of the former tenants was one of Sue’s associates. Sue writes:

“There is an email dated 4/14/14 from you to developer’s attorney Kevlin where you describe the building rather ‘neutrally’ as being ‘currently vacant.’ Since this is a PDR building and the former industrial tenants were involuntarily moved out, I do not believe this understatement is correct. You have an email from Jim Heron about how he and all other tenants (which were arts or light industrial) were evicted in December 2012. It seems to be the commercial equivalent of residential tenants being evicted, then the apartment building being described as ‘vacant.’” Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under planning, Uncategorized

Controversial ex-commissioner flacks for Build Inc.’s 1532 Harrison project

by JIM MEKO

SoMa neighbors who attended Jane Kim’s 10th and Harrison recycling center meeting two weeks ago were surprised to find an email from Terrance Alan in their inbox on Friday. Alan, the ethically challenged former entertainment commissioner, had nothing to do with the center but Kim’s office apparently shared the sign-in sheets with him.  Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

It’s the neighborhoods that make San Francisco special

As the San Francisco establishment bemoans the loss of the George Lucas museum to Chicago and chafes at the opening of a new 49ers stadium 45 miles south of the city, in an essay titled “Lucas might be gone, but the force stays right here,” San Francisco Chronicle columnist Carl Nolte reminds us that “We still have Clement Street. And 18th Street on Potrero Hill, Stockton Street in Chinatown, Valencia Street in the Mission, Irving Street in the Inner Sunset, Taraval Street in the Parkside.”

“So what makes a neighborhood?” Nolte asks. “There are certain essentials, like a Muni line down the shopping street, stores, a bank branch, a neighborhood restaurant or two where they know the customers. There should be a school and at least one church. A community garden. A park is important. A branch library and a bookstore are prized.”

In an impressively prescient piece, Nolte reminds us to keep our priorities straight. Read more →

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

City takes aim at working class jobs

man under car

By JIM MEKO

Last time we checked in on our buddies over at the Planning Department, they were putting the finishing touches on their “Central SoMa Plan,” an ambitious new area plan that would devastate our neighborhood’s service and light industrial base and blow the lid off job protections built into the recently adopted Western SoMa Community Plan. As Planning Director John Rahaim reportedly said, “this is really about expanding downtown.” (see “The attack on SoMa – a new downtown?”)

In light of the fact that their own calculations show that the Central SoMa scheme would destroy about 1,800 good working class jobs in order to build more high tech offices, they have proposed a nifty solution right around the corner in “the Eastern Neighborhoods” that would incentivize the construction of brand new production, distribution and repair (PDR) space (you’re not gonna believe this) by allowing even more high tech office space to be built on land that was set aside as a “haven for PDR businesses.”  This new construction would provide 33% new PDR space at a cost of allowing in 66% more high tech office space.  Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under planning, Uncategorized

What Tech Hasn’t Learned From Urban Planning

by ALLISON ARIEFF
New York Times

The tech sector is, increasingly, embracing the language of urban planning — town hall, public square, civic hackathons, community engagement. So why are tech companies such bad urbanists? Read more →

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized