Category Archives: transportation

Why one-way streets are bad for everyone but speeding cars

An EIR is currently underway to study whether Folsom Street should be converted to two-way traffic.

An EIR is currently underway to study whether Folsom Street should be converted to two-way traffic.

by EMILY BADGER
The Washington Post

“Traffic tends to move faster on a wide one-way road than on a comparable two-way city street, and slower traffic means fewer accidents. The rest of these results are theoretically connected to each other in complex ways. To the extent that vice flourishes on neglected high-speed, one-way, getaway roads, two-way streets may be less conducive to certain crimes. If they bring slower traffic and, as a result, more cyclists and pedestrians, that also creates more “eyes on the street” — which, again, deters crime. A decline in crime and calmer traffic in turn may raise property values — which may also increase the demand of residents to police and care for their neighborhood.” To read the complete article, visit The Washington Post blogs

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San Francisco Ranks 2nd For Worst Traffic In The U.S.

Boeing 777 Crashes At San Francisco Airport

Build baby build more offices with no regional transit improvements, and voila!

from JAMIE WHITAKER

San Francisco has the second worst traffic in the country, just behind Los Angeles, according to a website that measures congestion levels in urban cities. To read the complete article, go to CBS San Francisco →

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Baltimore’s ‘Charm City Circulator’ designed for easier center-city access

charm city

“Smart Transit” gadfly Howard Wong included a discussion of free shuttle loops in his New Years email blast.

Free useful shuttle loops are the hottest transit trend in the United States, Wong writes, with big gains in new ridership — like in Baltimore, Dallas, Raleigh, Denver, Minneapolis, Bethesda, Aspen, Long Beach, South San Francisco, Oakland, Emeryville, Walnut Creek, Palo Alto, East Palo Alto, Mountain View, PresidioGo, UCSF, Mission Bay. Funding mechanisms vary — public, private, public/ private business, parking taxes, transit grants, advertising. In San Francisco, every neighborhood’s loop bus could connect markets, commercial cores, schools, libraries and major transit corridors for free.

“Baltimore’s new transit network, which supplements the city’s metro rail, light rail, commuter rail, and bus routes, is the most recent example of a trend that has taken American cities by storm: the creation of auxiliary routes for the inner-city that are designed for frequent, high-quality service with the goal of attracting onto buses people who aren’t used to public transportation.” His link to “Cities Develop Alternative Bus Networks to Combat Perceived Disadvantages of Mainline Routes” at “The Transport Politic” is five years old but a check of Baltimore’s “Charm City Circulator” website indicates the system is alive and well, with 10-15 minute spacing on a growing number of routes in their winter schedule.

“It has been like pulling teeth to get the City to deal with poor transit circulation as areas are rezoned for housing and dense offices,” writes Sue Hestor, singling out the Eastern Neighborhoods as most lacking in comprehensive transit planning. “Why not free bus loops NOW?” she asks.  Continue reading →

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What good are these Muni improvements doing anyway?

DNA notice

[UPDATE: The engineers have decided to”integrate” the public parklet into the transit bulbout rather than demolish it].

“Public parklets” are a poor excuse for open space but they’re better than nothing. So, when a city agency signals that they’re about to remove one, it’s cause for concern.  Continue reading

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City agency fails SoMa in first major reevaluation of Muni system in 30 years

by JIM MEKO

MUNI just discontinued the northbound #9 San Bruno bus stop at 11th and Mission Streets. I think that’s about all we’re gonna get from the Transit Effectiveness Project (TEP).

What once sounded so promising went down in flames as the result of arrogant planners and a flawed public process. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) turned a deaf ear to a group of community leaders who had spent more than three years developing a community transportation plan.

While the Planning Department rezoned almost a quarter of the city in the Eastern Neighborhoods process without ever addressing transportation needs, the community planning process here in Western SoMa based its entire plan on transportation improvements.  Continue reading

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Help improve transit connections in the Rincon Hill neighborhood

by JAMIE WHITAKER
www.RinconHillSF.org

The Rincon Hill neighborhood has an opportunity to get local bus service again. First, the SFMTA and MUNI need to get information from us (residents, workers, or visitors who would maybe use a bus to travel to and from the waterfront along Folsom or Harrison Streets)!

Also, if you work in the neighborhood (South of Market Street, east of 2nd Street), please consider asking your HR Dept. if the survey and informational website links can be sent around the office because the City would like to gather input from commuters who might be potential users of any new local bus service with stops around Folsom Street and/or Harrison Street east of 2nd Street near the waterfront. Go direct to the survey: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1718957/Rincon-Hill-Survey

Continue reading 

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Do you drive? Would you like to earn $50 for one hour’s work?

A local consulting firm would like to speak with a few people who regularly drive in San Francisco. They will be holding a one-hour focus group in the afternoon of Tuesday, June 10 in the Upper Market area. The meeting will be run by MIG, a bay area communications and planning company, in order to reduce bias in the feedback, the client cannot be identified at this time, but will be revealed at the end of the focus group. Refreshments and $50 per participant will be provided at the meeting.

To sign up to participate, you can fill out a two-minute questionnaire that you must respond to by Wednesday June 4th: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1678759/Focus-Group-Inquiry

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