Category Archives: quality of life

What good are these Muni improvements doing anyway?

DNA notice

[UPDATE: The engineers have decided to"integrate" the public parklet into the transit bulbout rather than demolish it].

“Public parklets” are a poor excuse for open space but they’re better than nothing. So, when a city agency signals that they’re about to remove one, it’s cause for concern.  Continue reading

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Hold your breath … freeway exit identified as prime residential site

freeway.exit

Jeremy Schaub from Gabriel Ng + Architects, Inc. has filed an application to build 12 two bedroom units of housing in this lovely alcove abutting the Ninth Street exit of highway 101. Air quality and the potential for flooding are two of the immediate drawbacks that come to mind.  Continue reading

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Gordon Biersch, before and after

from BRIAN WALLACE

before and after

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S.F. has new data-driven solution to old S.F. problem: human excrement

by JOHN COTE
San Francisco Chronicle

Today the Department of Public Works will roll out the city’s latest approach: mobile bathroom stations at the three most well-used areas. Each station will include two specially outfitted portable toilets, a sink, a needle disposal bin and a dog waste station, all mounted on a flatbed trailer.

“We’re championing our residents’ right to clean streets and a safe place to do their business with dignity,” said Supervisor Jane Kim, who represents the area and has been pursuing a public toilet program since fall of 2012. Continue reading →

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“[Our] office supports responsible recycling centers in our city.”

from SUNNY ANGULO
Legislative Aide, District 6

I want to thank everyone for coming out to last month’s community meeting at the Arc San Francisco (and especially thank the Arc for hosting). I would also like to thank the city staff that took time out of their evening to come and offer resources and input, including the Mayor’s Office of HOPE Director Bevan Dufty and Kevin Drew from the Department of the Environment. Finally, I’d like to thank the individuals that emailed or called me privately after the meeting and expressed their disappointment with the behavior of some of their neighbors and recommitted themselves to working toward positive solutions that would benefit everyone in the neighborhood. On a personal note, I was deeply appreciative of that, so thank you. Continue reading

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Report from SoMa neighbors regarding the 10th and Harrison recycling center

from SF SoMa Neighbors:

Last week approximately 70 residents and local business owners attended a neighborhood meeting concerning the proposed recycling/buyback center at 10th and Harrison Streets. Almost everyone in the audience was opposed.

Sunny Angulo, an aide in Supervisor Kim’s office moderated the meeting. She stated that Our Planet Recycling was issued a permit in error, and that they would be required, per a letter from the City Zoning Administrator, to re-apply for permits. This will require neighborhood notification, and the neighbors can then file appeals to block or modify the permit. Neighbors could also file with the Planning Department for a Discretionary Review (DR).  
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Putting together the pieces to land Lucas Museum at Lot 330

lucas museum

from LAWRENCE STOKUS
South Beach gadfly

UPDATE: The Windy City beat out other cities, including a contentious battle against San Francisco, winning the bid to build an interactive museum for “Star Wars” creator George Lucas. – CNN

As we await George Lucas’ decision as to where he wants to locate his museum, keep several things in mind:

1. Locating the Lucas Museum on Lot 330 is an excellent choice and the neighborhood (and the city) seem to be wholly in favor of the concept. However, the museum location is just one aspect of the project.

2. Equally important is how the Port and the City will handle the redevelopment of the South Beach waterfront in conjunction with the Lucas Museum project. Namely, what will happen to the derelict piers (26, 28, 30-32 & 38) that are now sitting empty and obstructing the South Beach waterfront?

3. This is a great opportunity to have both a world class museum and a world class waterfront in South Beach. We must focus on both aspects of the project.

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Filed under economics, entertainment, open space, planning, quality of life