Category Archives: planning

10th and Mission an intersection at crossroads of S.F. revival

10th Street

from BRIAN WALLACE

“We used to leave here late, and there was nobody on the street. Now, people at night are walking their dogs,” marveled Barbara Gualco, regional director of real estate development for Mercy Housing. “Dogs wearing booties, with manicures. The most perfect dogs you’ve ever seen.”

Brian sends along a John King piece from the Chronicle. King finally noticed all the cranes clustered around the corner of 10th and Mission Streets and observes that dramatic changes are underway in our neighborhood. “Honestly, I’m not sure that 10th and Mission will ever be cool,” King writes, “but it’s becoming integrated into the city’s daily life, and that’s a startling fact in itself.”

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Baltimore’s ‘Charm City Circulator’ designed for easier center-city access

charm city

“Smart Transit” gadfly Howard Wong included a discussion of free shuttle loops in his New Years email blast.

Free useful shuttle loops are the hottest transit trend in the United States, Wong writes, with big gains in new ridership — like in Baltimore, Dallas, Raleigh, Denver, Minneapolis, Bethesda, Aspen, Long Beach, South San Francisco, Oakland, Emeryville, Walnut Creek, Palo Alto, East Palo Alto, Mountain View, PresidioGo, UCSF, Mission Bay. Funding mechanisms vary — public, private, public/ private business, parking taxes, transit grants, advertising. In San Francisco, every neighborhood’s loop bus could connect markets, commercial cores, schools, libraries and major transit corridors for free.

“Baltimore’s new transit network, which supplements the city’s metro rail, light rail, commuter rail, and bus routes, is the most recent example of a trend that has taken American cities by storm: the creation of auxiliary routes for the inner-city that are designed for frequent, high-quality service with the goal of attracting onto buses people who aren’t used to public transportation.” His link to “Cities Develop Alternative Bus Networks to Combat Perceived Disadvantages of Mainline Routes” at “The Transport Politic” is five years old but a check of Baltimore’s “Charm City Circulator” website indicates the system is alive and well, with 10-15 minute spacing on a growing number of routes in their winter schedule.

“It has been like pulling teeth to get the City to deal with poor transit circulation as areas are rezoned for housing and dense offices,” writes Sue Hestor, singling out the Eastern Neighborhoods as most lacking in comprehensive transit planning. “Why not free bus loops NOW?” she asks.  Continue reading →

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Rahaim’s alley policy imposed on SoMa

Here's one traffic-calming measure that didn't work too well.

Here’s one traffic-calming measure that didn’t work too well.

photo by Martha Bridegam

 

Planning Director John Rahaim prevailed in the contest between where driveways should go for the 1140 Folsom Street project. The community didn’t want 84 additional cars dumped into their already crowded Residential Enclave District and the Planning Department did. The seven members of the Planning Commission accepted a handful of traffic-calming mitigations and Rahaim’s “Driveway Location Policy” became the Commission’s unofficial policy.  Continue reading

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110 The Embarcadero is not just historic because it is 100-years-old

It was Harry Bridges’ headquarters during the 1934 waterfront strike


by
DAVE OSGOOD

If you support historic preservation, you’ll want to join the effort to protect one of the most historic buildings in town. 110 The Embarcadero is not just historic because it is 100-years-old, it was Harry Bridges’ headquarters during the 1934 waterfront strike. According to the July 1934 phone book, both the strike committee and union were headquartered there. History was made in this building. On “Bloody Thursday” the SFPD fired teargas through the windows on both sides of the building. The Commonwealth Club is trying to cover-up this history so they can avoid preservation requirements.   Continue reading

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Flower Mart developer announces new deal but opponents cry foul 

by JONAH LAMB
San Francisco Examiner

A signature drive will start at month’s end for a ballot measure filed earlier this year, and refiled with a new name Thursday — the Flower Mart and Jobs Protection Act. The measure would prevent anything from operating other than what is currently zoned for the Flower Mart site.  Continue reading →

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The Priesthood

SOMA dies

Photo by Allan Berube, from the collection of Gayle Rubin

by JIM MEKO

In his role as chair of Budget and Finance, former Supervisor Chris Daly was rather blunt when the Planning Department came before his committee looking for money: you’re not gonna see one dime of this funding until you listen to the community and start cooperating with them.

Harsh? They deserved it.  Continue reading

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Academy of Arts University sets their sights on more SoMa sites

AAU expansion pland

AAU expansion plans

 

The Academy of Arts University, much more a real estate consortium than an educational institution, is finally about to release its Institutional Master Plan. A hearing at the Planning Commission is scheduled for December 10. Their current facilities and expansion plans will finally come under the scrutiny of the city. For years the AAU illegally converted office space to institutional facilities and bought up much of the affordable housing supply in low income parts of the city to be used as student housing. The Academy’s own system of mass transit links together their network of facilities throughout the city.  Continue reading

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