Category Archives: open space

363 6th Street – Adding shadows to low income youth’s Gene Friend Recreation Center

There is a joint hearing between the Recreation and Parks Department and the Planning Commission this Thursday, October 15, 2015 at Noon at City Hall Room 400 to decide on approval of adding shadows to Gene Friend Recreation Center and park by approving the project as proposed for 363 6th Street. It is also abusing the 5′ bump that the Eastern SoMa Area Plan specifically states is intended for use for a 15′ gracious ground floor for retail or production, distribution, or repair usage specifically by using the extra 5′ to fit 9 residential floors into 85′.

From a very knowledgable friend of SoMa:

This increases shadow on Gene Friend Playground – the playground for SoMa youth.  One month after JOINT hrg for 5M project  where SAME bodies approved shadow increase on Boeddeker Park in the TENDERLOIN.  BOTH are playgrounds for low income communities.  In both the shadows are cast by a market rate housing project in the  South of Market.

363 6th St is the first of the FOUR “5-footers” proposed by  the same developer in SoMa.   363 in the YOUTH & FAMILY ZONE – AND  increases shadows on Gene Friend Playground.

363 is NOT the first 5-footer”   in SoMa.  The first was 1532 Harrison (across from Eagle) was approved Thursday, October 8, 2015 by Planning Commission. (1532 also excavated 4′ down for the added condos.)

5-footer” is where a developer uses the extra 5 feet in height granted to have increased ceiling heights for ground floor retail, commercial, PDR uses.  The developer squeezes in another story of condos ($$) .  This was a personal concern of Jim Meko. He raised it  on Public Comment at the last Commission meetings he attended.  At 363 there are 9 stories in an 85′ height limit.


 Rec and Parks gives excuse for allowing increased shadows on Boeddeker and Gene Friend:  It looks at CURRENT hours and use and concludes shadows won’t have serious impact.  But parks in other parts of the City – that receive greater attention and budget priority – ARE funded for openings for morning activity.

USE PATTERNS CHANGE.  Rec Park used the same rationale when it allowed more shadow on Mission Playground.  By the time the shadowing condos were built, the playground area had been redesigned with greatly increased use.

The entire east side of 6th Street – in the Y&F Zone – has been sold and is in play for substantial development. 

Please attend the meeting Thursday at Noon at City Hall in Room 400 if at all possible.

Related Staff Reports and Files for 363 6th Street:

2011.0586KXc1

Item 1A Attachment I – Reso for Agenda Item 1A 101515

Item 1B Attachment J – Reso for Agenda Item 1B 101515

Items 1A and 1B 363 6th Street Staff Report 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment A – Gene Friend_363 6th St. Location Map 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment B – 363 6th St Site Renderings and Plans 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment C – Gene Friend Park Map 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment D – 363 6th Street CADP Shadow Analysis 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment E – Maximum Shadow Image 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment F – Cumulative Shadow on Gene Friend with Chart 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment G – Project Sponsor Letter 101515

Items 1A and 1B Attachment H – Comment Letters 101515

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High-rise towers threaten Rincon Park

rincon high-rises

by DAVE OSGOOD

Environmental groups and neighborhood advocates gathered recently at Rincon Park on San Francisco’s waterfront to announce a new campaign to protect the well-used waterfront park from being darkened by shadows from proposed new high-rise luxury towers.  Later this summer, developers are expected to ask city officials to approve two tall new luxury high-rise condo towers:  one rising to 240 feet at 75 Howard facing the Embarcadero and another rising to 400 feet at 160 Folsom, a block from the waterfront.  As proposed, the two towers would be far taller than the 8 Washington “wall on the waterfront” luxury condos that voters overwhelmingly rejected.  Continue reading

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Private party for Mayors Conference closes Rincon Park access to public

20150620_USCM2015_ClosedRinconPark800

by JAMIE WHITAKER

Without any communications from The Port of San Francisco or the Mayor’s Office to anybody that lives along the SoMa waterfront, it was a great surprise to find that the BCDC’s supposed Public Access Seating Area that sits between Waterbar and Epic Steakhouse was closed to the Public because the U.S. Conference of Mayor’s party planners decided to buy the Embarcadero Pedestrian Promenade and Rincon Park away from the Public starting around 5pm today (Saturday, June 20th) to set up their party – and I’m guessing it will continue to be closed off to the public on Sunday.  Continue reading

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Putting together the pieces to land Lucas Museum at Lot 330

lucas museum

from LAWRENCE STOKUS
South Beach gadfly

UPDATE: The Windy City beat out other cities, including a contentious battle against San Francisco, winning the bid to build an interactive museum for “Star Wars” creator George Lucas. – CNN

As we await George Lucas’ decision as to where he wants to locate his museum, keep several things in mind:

1. Locating the Lucas Museum on Lot 330 is an excellent choice and the neighborhood (and the city) seem to be wholly in favor of the concept. However, the museum location is just one aspect of the project.

2. Equally important is how the Port and the City will handle the redevelopment of the South Beach waterfront in conjunction with the Lucas Museum project. Namely, what will happen to the derelict piers (26, 28, 30-32 & 38) that are now sitting empty and obstructing the South Beach waterfront?

3. This is a great opportunity to have both a world class museum and a world class waterfront in South Beach. We must focus on both aspects of the project.

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Time to Demolish Piers 30-32

Real estate blog “Linked-in” graphically illustrates the Warriors petulant surrender to community concerns by switching the location of their new arena from prime waterfront property to the backwaters of Mission Bay. ”Move along, move along now. No story here.”

Real estate blog “Linked-in” graphically illustrates the Warriors curt surrender to community concerns by switching the location of their new arena from prime waterfront property to the backwaters of Mission Bay. ”Move along, move along now. No story here.”

by JAMIE WHITAKER
SoMa activist and 2014 D6 candidate for Supervisor

I believe that we should take the success of the Brannan Street Wharf’s demolition of Piers 34 and 36 and creation of more seating and open space, and continue the design northward by demolishing Piers 30-32 and building out a continuation of the open space with proceeds from the sale and development of Seawall Lot 330 across the street. Brannan Street Wharf’s demolition of Piers 34 and 36 plus the development of the park itself cost $26.1 million. Even if it costs twice as much to demolish Piers 30-32, the value of the land across the street and what could be developed within 105′ should be able to pay for it.  Continue reading

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No Wall initiative heads to June ballot

waterfront

 

by JIM MEKO

The “No Wall on the Waterfront” campaign turned in more than double the number of signatures needed to qualify a measure for the June 3 ballot that would require voter approval for any development on the San Francisco waterfront that exceeds the existing height limit.  Continue reading

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Update: Ringold fully funded !!!

The vote was 10-3 and it required 10 votes to pass (a quorum issue). The final motion was to provide $1.8 million and the representative from the Transportation Authority guaranteed us an additional $200,000 to make us whole.

Kudos to Glendon Hyde and Demetri Moshoyannis too. They brought out more than a dozen folks for public comment and each and every story they told almost brought me to tears. It was a solemn and hushed crowd and an important moment for the body.

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