Category Archives: economics

Developers Aren’t Going to Solve the Housing Crisis in San Francisco

by DYAN RUIZ and JOSEPH SMOOKE
from [people. power. media]

[people. power. media] is an independent media channel focused on the perspectives of grassroots organizations and marginalized communities broadcasting on the internet and through social networking. This essay was published by two authors with San Francisco roots who have tired of the so-called conventional wisdom referenced in the following four myths.

Myth 1:
Housing is expensive because there isn’t enough supply.
Fact:
Housing is expensive because so many techies and investors want to rent and buy in San Francisco. Prices are mostly determined by high-end demand.

Myth 2:
Developers are building high-end housing because it’s expensive to build housing in San Francisco.
Fact:
Even if building costs are lower, developers will build expensive housing, as long as there’s enough demand for it.

Myth 3:
Let developers build taller buildings. Then prices will go down.
Fact:
Upzoning won’t solve the housing problem for many reasons.

Myth 4:
As long as you can upzone and deregulate, you can build and build to the point where prices will go down.
Fact:
That’s not the way that housing development works. Housing finance has limits.

Solutions:
Rethinking private and public sectors roles in a new economy

Read the full article at [people. power. media]

 

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Filed under economics, housing, planning

Tax-break tech hiring a bust in Tenderloin

Positions to date: 1 full-time, 5 summer interns

 

from the CENTRAL CITY EXTRA

When the Twitter tax break was signed, the mayor’s office had high hopes that the expanding technology boom would explode with local hiring and that the incoming Internet companies could help make his dream of 2,500 new tech jobs come true.

Read the complete story at Central City Extra.

 

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Kim protects PDR (at least until the November election)

by JIM MEKO

Supervisor Jane Kim followed through with her promise to the Flower Mart workers by introducing Interim Controls on Tuesday that would slow down the conversion of PDR (production, distribution and repair) businesses into high tech offices but put a 45 day lid on the controls. That’s just enough time to get her reelected in November.  Continue reading

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Drone startup set to launch on Bryant Street

 

drones-2

Founded in 2010 in Newport Beach, California, last month Airware picked up another $25 million to help ease them into their new corporate headquarters at 1045 Bryant Street, formerly the home of House of Louie Appliances. They’re just completing an extensive remodel, with retail on the ground floor and two floors of offices above.  Continue reading

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Gordon Biersch, before and after

from BRIAN WALLACE

before and after

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Filed under economics, planning, quality of life

Is it open season on Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR)?

sf-thumb

from BRIAN WALLACE

Is it ‘Open Season’ on Production, Distribution, and Repair (PDR) in SoMa? Especially active, vibrant small businesses that help dented cars look good, replace broken car windows (no shortage of them in SoMa), provide great tasting Mexican food to locals, and employ hard-working people without college degrees.

Did I miss the memo? Read more→

 

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Filed under community services, economics, planning

Putting together the pieces to land Lucas Museum at Lot 330

lucas museum

from LAWRENCE STOKUS
South Beach gadfly

UPDATE: The Windy City beat out other cities, including a contentious battle against San Francisco, winning the bid to build an interactive museum for “Star Wars” creator George Lucas. – CNN

As we await George Lucas’ decision as to where he wants to locate his museum, keep several things in mind:

1. Locating the Lucas Museum on Lot 330 is an excellent choice and the neighborhood (and the city) seem to be wholly in favor of the concept. However, the museum location is just one aspect of the project.

2. Equally important is how the Port and the City will handle the redevelopment of the South Beach waterfront in conjunction with the Lucas Museum project. Namely, what will happen to the derelict piers (26, 28, 30-32 & 38) that are now sitting empty and obstructing the South Beach waterfront?

3. This is a great opportunity to have both a world class museum and a world class waterfront in South Beach. We must focus on both aspects of the project.

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Filed under economics, entertainment, open space, planning, quality of life