Category Archives: economics

“A new era” for the Flower Mart

The owners and vendors of the Flower Mart and the Kilroy Corporation have signed an agreement that guarantees the 100 year old institution will remain at its current location for generations to come. The document includes assurances that the existing vendors will continue to be able to rent at an affordable rate, that the vendors themselves will make the decision as to whether the new location will be underground or at street level, that the new development will provide twice the amount of parking that currently exists (and new space for outdoor markets and community events) and recognizes the ownership rights and ability to pass the affordable rates on to the next generation or to any other entity of the vendor’s choice. Continue reading

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SF Chron reports, “Flower Mart developer heads off thorny ballot fight”

Last-minute negotiations have headed off what could have been a costly ballot fight between tech money and longtime small businesses that are feeling priced out of San Francisco — in this case, at the Flower Mart in the South of Market.

San Francisco Chronicle →
San Francisco Examiner →

 

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Why one-way streets are bad for everyone but speeding cars

An EIR is currently underway to study whether Folsom Street should be converted to two-way traffic.

An EIR is currently underway to study whether Folsom Street should be converted to two-way traffic.

by EMILY BADGER
The Washington Post

“Traffic tends to move faster on a wide one-way road than on a comparable two-way city street, and slower traffic means fewer accidents. The rest of these results are theoretically connected to each other in complex ways. To the extent that vice flourishes on neglected high-speed, one-way, getaway roads, two-way streets may be less conducive to certain crimes. If they bring slower traffic and, as a result, more cyclists and pedestrians, that also creates more “eyes on the street” — which, again, deters crime. A decline in crime and calmer traffic in turn may raise property values — which may also increase the demand of residents to police and care for their neighborhood.” To read the complete article, visit The Washington Post blogs

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Filed under crime watch, economics, planning, public safety, quality of life, transportation

Flower Mart developer announces new deal but opponents cry foul 

by JONAH LAMB
San Francisco Examiner

A signature drive will start at month’s end for a ballot measure filed earlier this year, and refiled with a new name Thursday — the Flower Mart and Jobs Protection Act. The measure would prevent anything from operating other than what is currently zoned for the Flower Mart site.  Continue reading →

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Developers Aren’t Going to Solve the Housing Crisis in San Francisco

by DYAN RUIZ and JOSEPH SMOOKE
from [people. power. media]

[people. power. media] is an independent media channel focused on the perspectives of grassroots organizations and marginalized communities broadcasting on the internet and through social networking. This essay was published by two authors with San Francisco roots who have tired of the so-called conventional wisdom referenced in the following four myths.

Myth 1:
Housing is expensive because there isn’t enough supply.
Fact:
Housing is expensive because so many techies and investors want to rent and buy in San Francisco. Prices are mostly determined by high-end demand.

Myth 2:
Developers are building high-end housing because it’s expensive to build housing in San Francisco.
Fact:
Even if building costs are lower, developers will build expensive housing, as long as there’s enough demand for it.

Myth 3:
Let developers build taller buildings. Then prices will go down.
Fact:
Upzoning won’t solve the housing problem for many reasons.

Myth 4:
As long as you can upzone and deregulate, you can build and build to the point where prices will go down.
Fact:
That’s not the way that housing development works. Housing finance has limits.

Solutions:
Rethinking private and public sectors roles in a new economy

Read the full article at [people. power. media]

 

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Tax-break tech hiring a bust in Tenderloin

Positions to date: 1 full-time, 5 summer interns

 

from the CENTRAL CITY EXTRA

When the Twitter tax break was signed, the mayor’s office had high hopes that the expanding technology boom would explode with local hiring and that the incoming Internet companies could help make his dream of 2,500 new tech jobs come true.

Read the complete story at Central City Extra.

 

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Kim protects PDR (at least until the November election)

by JIM MEKO

Supervisor Jane Kim followed through with her promise to the Flower Mart workers by introducing Interim Controls on Tuesday that would slow down the conversion of PDR (production, distribution and repair) businesses into high tech offices but put a 45 day lid on the controls. That’s just enough time to get her reelected in November.  Continue reading

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